What Is Clicker Training?

Clicker training uses sound to create a language between animals and their owners. When you’re clicker training your pet, you hold the tiny plastic box in the palm of your hand and then press down the metal tongue to make the sound. The clicker is followed by a treat, which is canine equivalent of giving people money for a job well done.

Before you start clicker training, you need to teach your dog what the clicker means. To do this, have your dog in the room while you’re watching TV with a container of tasty treats in reach. Place a treat in one hand and the clicker in the other. Click once and open your hand to give your pet the treat. Go back to watching TV, then repeat the process a several times at varying intervals. When your dog starts to look at you as soon as he hears the click, you’re ready to move on to the next step.

Clicker training works best when you limit yourself to working on one behavior at a time, such as sitting or lying down. Limit the length of your session to 15 minutes or less to respect your pet’s short attention span. Start clicker training in a relatively calm environment so your dog does not become unnecessarily distracted.

Here’s the general process for clicker training:

  • Give your pet the command for the behavior.
  • Click once when your pet does the behavior you want him to do. It’s helpful to pretend you’re taking a picture of the behavior.
  • Immediately follow the click with a tasty treat.
  • Try to end the session on a high note where your dog has done the desired behavior and been rewarded with a treat.

If you don’t have a clicker or don’t want to use a device that requires a spare hand, you can use a one syllable word like “Good” or “Yes” to accomplish the same goal. Just remember to say the word at the same volume and in the same tone of voice each time to create consistency between training sessions.

 

Green Bark Gummies Are Perfect for Clicker Training

Green Bark Gummies chia-based dog treats are a nutritious and delicious addition to your training toolkit. These quality dog treats are made with NutriCHIA to provide a valuable source of Omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidant-rich plant lignans, and essential minerals.

Teaching Children How to Stay Safe Around Dogs

Even dogs who are known for their calm disposition can turn aggressive if they are provoked by a child who does not understand how to properly behave around animals. As a pet owner, the best thing you can do for your family is to make sure your children understand how to stay safe around your pooch.

Here are some basic safety tips children should be taught for interacting with the family pet:

  • Never pull a dog’s ears or tail.
  • Do not try to climb on or ride a large dog.
  • Do not carry a small dog around like a doll or stuffed animal.
  • If you are playing with the dog and he leaves, do not try to follow him. This is his way of telling you that he is done playing for now.
  • The dog’s bed or crate is his personal space. When the dog is in his bed or crate, he should be left alone.
  • Dogs want to enjoy their meal without interruptions from children. Do not try to play with the dog while he is eating or attempt to tease him by taking away his food.
  • Never try to wake a sleeping dog by touching him.

When dealing with animals other than the family pet, children should be taught to ask a dog’s owner for permission before attempting to touch the animal. The owner is the best person to determine if the dog is friendly enough to handle being petted by a child.

If a child encounters a loose dog while walking to school or a friend’s house, he should be taught to avoid the animal by confidently yet quietly walking away and then telling an adult about the situation. If a dog goes after a child, the child should pretend to be a tree by standing quietly with his hands low and head down. This defensive position is safer than escalating the situation by running away, yelling, or attempting to hit the dog.

 

Pamper Your Four-Legged Friend

A quality diet can keep you pet healthy for many years to come. Green Bark Gummies dog treats were developed by a veterinarian after consulting with nutritionists, scientists, and animal health experts. They are made with high quality fish, meat, and greens without any byproducts or cheap fillers. Learn more at greenbarkgummies.com.

 

How to Train your Dog to Take Treats Gently

If your dog has developed the habit of taking treats out of your hand fast and hard or you want to train him the right way to take treats from the beginning, use this method to teach him how to take treats gently. You won’t have to be concerned about your dog lunging forward to get the treats, and you can show other members of your household the right way to offer treats so your four-legged friend doesn’t become confused when it’s treat time.

 

Train your Dog to Take Treats Gently

1) Take some small dog treats (about the size of popcorn) and have your dog sit. Take the treat and hold it in your hand like a closed fist. Starting with your hand at your side, slowly move your fist up under your dog’s nose.

2) When your dog gives your fist a nudge with his nose, open your hand, palm facing up. The dog will eat the treat from your flattened hand. Be sure to keep your fingers together.

3) While your dog stays in a seated position, repeat this process of offering a food treat several (10-20) times. If your dog stands up, tell him to sit down again. When he has calmly and gently eaten the training treat from the palm of your hand several times in a row, you can move on to the next step.

4) Move the hand with the treat toward your dog in exactly the same manner as you had been doing (bring it up from your side to just under your dog’s jaw). Now, instead of holding the training treat in your closed fist, hold it under your thumb, keeping it completely hidden. Your thumb should be on top of your hand, with all four fingers together on the bottom. When your dog touches your hand with his nose, move your thumb out of the way so he can get the treat. Do this technique about 10 times. Once the dog has taken the food from your fingers several times in a row in a calm manner, you can move on to the next step in the process.

5) Continue to offer treats in the same manner as in Step 4. This time, begin to alternate holding the food under your thumb with holding it between the fingertips of all five of your fingers, leaving the food slightly exposed. You should still bring your hand up slowly under the dog’s chin in the same manner as before.

 

Over a period of several weeks of training, start with the first step and work toward Step 5. Over time it should take fewer repetitions between the steps to get the result you want. With practice, the dog will stop snapping at your fingers. Do not let your children give your dog treats until the dog has learned not to snap at food. Once the dog has been trained, always supervise children and dogs when it’s treat time.

 

Green Bark Gummies are the perfect treat to help train your dog to take treats gently. These Chia-based dog treats are nutritious, delicious, and are devoid of any artificial flavors, colors, wheat, corn, soy, and are also non-GMO. They are available in formulations for dogs that are both under 30 pounds (Skin & Coat and Healthy Digestion) and over 30 pounds (Hip & Joint and Skin & Coat varieties), you can learn more about these healthy dog treats at greenbarkgummies.com!