Is It True That Dogs Can Smell Cancer?

It is common knowledge that dogs have a particularly strong sense of smell. They can smell scents that the human nose is unable to pick up. It’s the reason that police use dogs when searching suspects for narcotics. And it’s the reason that enforcement teams take bomb-sniffing dogs out when investigating a dangerous area. And many leading researchers are hoping to put the animal’s innate sense of smell to use in medical care. Within this blog, we’ll look at whether dogs truly can smell cancer within people.

Studies Show Dogs Can Succeed in Sniffing Out Cancer

Research, including a new study by the experts at the Humanitas Research Hospital in Milan, has shown that dogs can sniff out cancer cells with exceptional accuracy in humans. The Humanitas Research Hospital study comprised of two German shepherds attempting to identify prostate cancer cells within urine samples from scent alone. During the study, one of the dogs showed an ability to correctly identify cancer cells with 100% accuracy. This figure is far higher than the average detection success rates with other scientific testing methods. The study is an example of the latest research showing dogs have a profound ability to recognize cancer cells.

There is still debate on how the animals detect cancer cells within human samples. However, the general consensus is that dogs have advanced olfactory senses which allow them to identify VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) associated with certain kinds of cancer.

How the Data is Being Used to Save Lives

The latest studies now show that dogs can potentially detect the presence of cancer cells in the human body. These studies show that we’re only just beginning to scratch the surface in terms of uncovering the value that dogs can bring to our lives.

They will require comprehensive training to hone their innate sense of smell. But with practice and with the further integration of dogs within medical analysis processes across the country, they could play a high value role in saving the lives of those with cancer. To discover more on this evolving subject, speak with one of our team members today!

Lactose Intolerance in Dogs

Lactose intolerance is one of the most common canine digestive disorders. It’s a disorder that involves an adverse reaction to milk and dairy products, and can cause dogs discomfort if not adequately treated when it first begins to impact their health. Within this blog, we’ll review the symptoms of lactose intolerance in dogs and highlight effective ways to care for dogs with lactose intolerance.

The Causes and the Symptoms of Lactose Intolerance

Cow and goat milk contains, on average, 4.5-to-5% lactose. This compares with 3.1% lactose in dog’s milk. This milk can be a great source of calcium in dogs whose systems can tolerate lactose. However, the higher level of lactose within dairy products can overpower a dog’s digestive system, especially in younger puppies. Lactose intolerance is largely related to a lack of the enzyme lactase, which is critical for puppies in milk digestion.

The symptoms of lactose intolerance in dogs include the following:

  • Abdominal sensitivity
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Bloating
  • Drinking excessive amounts of water

In cases where your pet appears to be suffering from one or a number of these symptoms over a period of days, it’s important to take them to a vet as soon as possible for analysis and treatment.

Caring for a Lactose Intolerant Dog – Listen to the Vet & Consider Lactose-Free Treats

One of the many challenges for those caring for a dog with lactose intolerance is that their diets must be carefully monitored to ensure no contact with dairy products.

Under certain circumstances, owners may be able to feed their dogs products such as cheese and unpasteurized yogurt, which usually have the lactose removed before being sold in stores. However, it remains exceptionally important to speak with a veterinary professional before making assumptions on a lactose intolerant dog’s ideal diet.

Fortunately, there are a number of high quality lactose-free items that all dogs can enjoy. Speak with your local area vet today if you feel your pet is suffering from lactose intolerance. Proactive owners can protect their pets against long-term physical issues. Working with your vet will allow you to create a regimen that offers optimal nutritional support to your dog for the long-term.

Are Dogs Really Colorblind?

It’s the age-old question we ask when thinking about our dogs and their experience of life. Are dogs colorblind? The question has now been answered by specialists and the answer provides important insights into dog behavior and their reaction to lighting conditions. Read on as we discover the truth about how dogs see the world.

The Truth is Dogs CAN See Color

Despite past theories that dogs can only see in black and white, they can actually see in certain degrees of color. The major difference between a human’s eyes and a dog’s eyes is the number of color-detecting cells (otherwise known as cones) within their eyes. Humans have three cones within each eye, which helps us differentiate between colors and shades. However, dogs only have two cones within each eye. This means their visible wavelength light spectrum is minimized.

What Do Dogs See?

Recent experiments have shown that a dog’s perception of their environment is similar to that of red-green color-blind people. Like those with red-green color blindness, dogs perceive color differently than humans with full color vision. This means that what most people see as red will appear as dark brown to the dog. And the colors green and orange each look yellow to varying degrees. An object that appears blue to humans while take a gray appearance when viewed through the lens of a dog’s eye.

Number of Light Receptors Higher in Dogs than Humans

However, while the amount of cones and the depth of color perception are limited in dogs, they do have superior light and motion detection capabilities. That’s because dogs have a higher ratio of photoreceptors (also called rods) to cones within their eyes than humans. This high concentration of rods allows dogs to see better in environments with limited light. Dogs also have a reflective membrane behind their retina, known as a tapetum, which reflects the light not captured by the rods and cones directly back into the dog’s retina. This enhanced light perception also allows dogs to quickly detect motion and empowers their greater nocturnal hunting abilities.

While dogs might be limited in their ability to see color, their lack of perception is more than balanced by their abilities to detect light and motion. Take this information into consideration the next time you enjoy playtime with your pup! To learn more on color perception in dogs, contact our team today!

Introducing Your Dog to Your New Baby

Dogs thrive on predictability, which means that adjusting to a new baby can be difficult. A dog who is used to having your undivided attention is naturally going to feel slighted when he’s competing with the needs of a demanding infant.

To help your pet adjust to the new addition to your family, you’ll want to start planning for baby’s arrival as soon as possible. If your dog hasn’t already been to a basic obedience class, make plans to complete a course as soon as you find out you’re expecting. Your instructor can help you correct behavior that could pose a safety hazard once your baby arrives, such as jumping up to greet you at the door.

Help your dog become used to the sight and sound of children by taking him to a park where children often play or to visit close friends with infants, toddlers, or preschoolers.

In your third trimester, get a life size doll and treat it like an infant. Set up your baby’s crib, bassinet, and swing for the doll to use. Sing to the doll and carry it around your home like you would a real baby. The goal is to get your dog gradually acclimated to the change in routine that an infant will bring.

If you’re the one who will be walking the dog after baby arrives, practice walking while pushing your baby’s stroller. Remember not to loop the leash on the stroller handle, since this could injure your baby if your dog sees a squirrel and takes off running.

After your baby is born, have someone bring home an outfit or two so your dog can get accustomed to the new baby’s scent before you return from the hospital. Stock up on tasty treats to reward your dog for being calm and tranquil while you’re nursing or giving baby a bottle.

Keep in mind that the normal squeals and cries of an infant can be distressing for a dog, so watch closely for pacing or unusual eye contact that could indicate your dog needs to be taken out of the room.

 

Reward Your Pooch with a Tasty Treat

Green Bark Gummies chia-based dog treats are a nutritious and delicious way to reward your dog for being on his best behavior around your new baby. These quality dog treats are available in formulas for dogs that are both under 30 pounds (Skin & Coat and Healthy Digestion) and over 30 pounds (Hip & Joint and Skin & Coat varieties).

Reasons Why You Should Consider Getting A Puppy

Are you considering getting a puppy? It’s an important decision for you and your family, and not something that you should be taking lightly. When you bring a puppy into your home, you need to understand that you are making a commitment that has the potential to last for a number of years. There are a number of good reasons why you should consider getting a puppy. Here are a few of the benefits welcoming a four-legged member of the family will get you.

 

Why You Should Consider Getting a Puppy

 

  • Owning a puppy will help you get regular exercise.

Your new puppy will need to go for walks on a regular basis, which means that you will be more physically active. Getting outside to get your heart rate elevated gives you several benefits, including lower risk of heart disease and stroke, improved outlook and increased ability to deal with stress.

 

  • Puppies act as wonderful “ice breakers” and can help you meet new friends.

Just about everyone is curious about a puppy and if you are looking for an easy way to meet new people, just go out in public with your new pet regularly. No one wants to feel isolated, and having a strong social network is an important part of your mental health.

 

  • They make us appreciate simple joys life has to offer.

The love that a puppy can offer you when you get home is pure and simple. The animal simply wants to be with you because he missed seeing you and wants to be with you now. You don’t have to be or do anything to prove yourself worthy of this gift; all you have to do is accept it.

Very few transactions in our completely over-scheduled world are that simple anymore. In a lot of instances, phone calls and e-mails are full of demands that we must do something to get the result that we want. In the case of a puppy, as long as we provide the necessities of life, it’s all good.

 

Treat your loyal companion to the very best in dog treats with Green Bark Gummies. They are nutritious, delicious, and are made without any artificial flavors, colors, wheat, corn, soy, and are also non-GMO. They are available for dogs that are both under 30 pounds (Skin & Coat and Healthy Digestion) and over 30 pounds (Hip & Joint and Skin & Coat varieties), you can learn more about these healthy treats at greenbarkgummies.com!

 

Why Your Dog Should Have a Dog Collar and Tag

A dog collar and tag is a basic piece of identification for your dog. Since he cannot speak for himself if he should become lost, stolen, or a victim of an accident or a natural disaster, it is your best chance to be reunited with this member of your family.

 

Why Your Dog Should Have a Dog Collar and Tag

If your beloved companion should happen to go missing, you have no way to officially identify him as belonging to you. A pet who has been missing or become injured may have a different appearance than usual, which will make identification challenging. Your pet may be picked up by an animal rescue agency but without a collar and tag, there is no way to contact you to let you know that your dog has been located.

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The Benefits of Having a Large Backyard for your Dog

If you are fortunate enough to have a large backyard at your home, your dog will be able to benefit from this built-in playground. Please note that having a large backyard doesn’t take the place of going for regular walks; spending time in the backyard is a different type of experience for your pet than actually patrolling the neighborhood.

You’ll still need to spend time going for regular walks with your dog so that he gets the experience of walking through his territory. This urge to roam is natural and was inherited from his wild ancestor, the wolf.

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Why Your Dog Loves Walks

Your dog doesn’t just love walks; he needs to go for walks regularly. It’s more than just a matter of feeling cooped up from having cabin fever from being inside the house or needing to take a bathroom break. Dogs are driven by a force that is bigger than themselves to get out and walk, and it’s instinct.

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Showing Affection For Your Dog

You love your dog and want to show your fur baby how much you care, but did you know there is a right and a wrong way to go about showing affection for your dog? There certainly is, and if you decide to lavish affection on your pet at the wrong time, you could end up reinforcing behavior patterns that you really don’t want to see repeated over the long term.

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Should Your Dog Sleep On Your Bed?

Depending on the owner, a dog’s sleeping area can greatly vary. Some people prefer to have their dog sleep at the end of their bed, while others set up a designated bed or crate for them to sleep in when it’s time to enter “slumber land.” Many people consider it a very important bonding ritual to allow their dog to sleep on their bed at night. Should your dog sleep on your bed? In this article, we’re going to look at some of the positives and negatives of letting your dog sleep on your bed.

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