What Is Clicker Training?

Clicker training uses sound to create a language between animals and their owners. When you’re clicker training your pet, you hold the tiny plastic box in the palm of your hand and then press down the metal tongue to make the sound. The clicker is followed by a treat, which is canine equivalent of giving people money for a job well done.

Before you start clicker training, you need to teach your dog what the clicker means. To do this, have your dog in the room while you’re watching TV with a container of tasty treats in reach. Place a treat in one hand and the clicker in the other. Click once and open your hand to give your pet the treat. Go back to watching TV, then repeat the process a several times at varying intervals. When your dog starts to look at you as soon as he hears the click, you’re ready to move on to the next step.

Clicker training works best when you limit yourself to working on one behavior at a time, such as sitting or lying down. Limit the length of your session to 15 minutes or less to respect your pet’s short attention span. Start clicker training in a relatively calm environment so your dog does not become unnecessarily distracted.

Here’s the general process for clicker training:

  • Give your pet the command for the behavior.
  • Click once when your pet does the behavior you want him to do. It’s helpful to pretend you’re taking a picture of the behavior.
  • Immediately follow the click with a tasty treat.
  • Try to end the session on a high note where your dog has done the desired behavior and been rewarded with a treat.

If you don’t have a clicker or don’t want to use a device that requires a spare hand, you can use a one syllable word like “Good” or “Yes” to accomplish the same goal. Just remember to say the word at the same volume and in the same tone of voice each time to create consistency between training sessions.

 

Green Bark Gummies Are Perfect for Clicker Training

Green Bark Gummies chia-based dog treats are a nutritious and delicious addition to your training toolkit. These quality dog treats are made with NutriCHIA to provide a valuable source of Omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidant-rich plant lignans, and essential minerals.

Introducing Your Dog to Your New Baby

Dogs thrive on predictability, which means that adjusting to a new baby can be difficult. A dog who is used to having your undivided attention is naturally going to feel slighted when he’s competing with the needs of a demanding infant.

To help your pet adjust to the new addition to your family, you’ll want to start planning for baby’s arrival as soon as possible. If your dog hasn’t already been to a basic obedience class, make plans to complete a course as soon as you find out you’re expecting. Your instructor can help you correct behavior that could pose a safety hazard once your baby arrives, such as jumping up to greet you at the door.

Help your dog become used to the sight and sound of children by taking him to a park where children often play or to visit close friends with infants, toddlers, or preschoolers.

In your third trimester, get a life size doll and treat it like an infant. Set up your baby’s crib, bassinet, and swing for the doll to use. Sing to the doll and carry it around your home like you would a real baby. The goal is to get your dog gradually acclimated to the change in routine that an infant will bring.

If you’re the one who will be walking the dog after baby arrives, practice walking while pushing your baby’s stroller. Remember not to loop the leash on the stroller handle, since this could injure your baby if your dog sees a squirrel and takes off running.

After your baby is born, have someone bring home an outfit or two so your dog can get accustomed to the new baby’s scent before you return from the hospital. Stock up on tasty treats to reward your dog for being calm and tranquil while you’re nursing or giving baby a bottle.

Keep in mind that the normal squeals and cries of an infant can be distressing for a dog, so watch closely for pacing or unusual eye contact that could indicate your dog needs to be taken out of the room.

 

Reward Your Pooch with a Tasty Treat

Green Bark Gummies chia-based dog treats are a nutritious and delicious way to reward your dog for being on his best behavior around your new baby. These quality dog treats are available in formulas for dogs that are both under 30 pounds (Skin & Coat and Healthy Digestion) and over 30 pounds (Hip & Joint and Skin & Coat varieties).

How to Train your Dog to Take Treats Gently

If your dog has developed the habit of taking treats out of your hand fast and hard or you want to train him the right way to take treats from the beginning, use this method to teach him how to take treats gently. You won’t have to be concerned about your dog lunging forward to get the treats, and you can show other members of your household the right way to offer treats so your four-legged friend doesn’t become confused when it’s treat time.

 

Train your Dog to Take Treats Gently

1) Take some small dog treats (about the size of popcorn) and have your dog sit. Take the treat and hold it in your hand like a closed fist. Starting with your hand at your side, slowly move your fist up under your dog’s nose.

2) When your dog gives your fist a nudge with his nose, open your hand, palm facing up. The dog will eat the treat from your flattened hand. Be sure to keep your fingers together.

3) While your dog stays in a seated position, repeat this process of offering a food treat several (10-20) times. If your dog stands up, tell him to sit down again. When he has calmly and gently eaten the training treat from the palm of your hand several times in a row, you can move on to the next step.

4) Move the hand with the treat toward your dog in exactly the same manner as you had been doing (bring it up from your side to just under your dog’s jaw). Now, instead of holding the training treat in your closed fist, hold it under your thumb, keeping it completely hidden. Your thumb should be on top of your hand, with all four fingers together on the bottom. When your dog touches your hand with his nose, move your thumb out of the way so he can get the treat. Do this technique about 10 times. Once the dog has taken the food from your fingers several times in a row in a calm manner, you can move on to the next step in the process.

5) Continue to offer treats in the same manner as in Step 4. This time, begin to alternate holding the food under your thumb with holding it between the fingertips of all five of your fingers, leaving the food slightly exposed. You should still bring your hand up slowly under the dog’s chin in the same manner as before.

 

Over a period of several weeks of training, start with the first step and work toward Step 5. Over time it should take fewer repetitions between the steps to get the result you want. With practice, the dog will stop snapping at your fingers. Do not let your children give your dog treats until the dog has learned not to snap at food. Once the dog has been trained, always supervise children and dogs when it’s treat time.

 

Green Bark Gummies are the perfect treat to help train your dog to take treats gently. These Chia-based dog treats are nutritious, delicious, and are devoid of any artificial flavors, colors, wheat, corn, soy, and are also non-GMO. They are available in formulations for dogs that are both under 30 pounds (Skin & Coat and Healthy Digestion) and over 30 pounds (Hip & Joint and Skin & Coat varieties), you can learn more about these healthy dog treats at greenbarkgummies.com!